.950 JDJ Worlds Largest "Sporting" Bullet

.950 JDJ
As its name implies, rifles chambered for the cartridge have a bore diameter of 0.950 in (24.1 mm), which would normally classify them as Destructive Devices in the United States However, SSK sought and received a "Sporting Use Exception" to de-regulate the rifles, meaning they can be purchased like any other Title I rifle by a person over age 18 with no felonies on their criminal record.
.950 JDJ Gun

U.S. military bayonets of WWI and WWII

U.S. military bayonets; from the top down, they are the M1905 Bayonet, M1 Bayonet, M1905E1 Bowie Point Bayonet (cut down version of the M1905), and the M4 Bayonet for the M1 Carbine.
U.S. military bayonets; from the top down, they are the M1905 Bayonet, M1 Bayonet, M1905E1 Bowie Point Bayonet (cut down version of the M1905), and the M4 Bayonet for the M1 Carbine.

.45-70 Government (.458, .45-70-405)

The 45-70 Government (.458, .45-70-405) cartridge was developed by the US government in 1873 for the Springfield 1873 trapdoor rifle. It was the replacement for the .50-70-450 cartridge to provide increased range, penetration and accuracy.
Springfield Model 1873
Springfield Model 1873
It is still a popular cartridge today among many big / dangerous game hunters in the 500 or 510 grain bullet as well as for lighter game in the 405 grain version. For hunters of grizzly, elephant,rhino,and Cape Buffalo the 45-70 is a great cartridge for closer shots. The recoil is substantial and hunters will need a bit of practice to develop the shooting skill this gun requires. Marlin and Winchester both produce excellent guns chambered in 45-70. Modern ammo is also readily available from most popular manufactures.
.30-06 Springfield vs .45-70 Government
From left, .30-06, .45-70, and .50-90 Sharps
45-70 rifle
45-70 lever gun