S&W Model 1 Through 1 1/2 and Variations With Pictures of Each

The Smith & Wesson Model 1 was issued in three different variations. Each issue included technical advances and redesigns. Listed below are the specifications of each issue  and what was changed as well as a visual example of each variation.
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Model 1 - 1st Issue
Smith and Wesson Model 1 - 1st Issue
The S&W Model 1 1st Issue is the most rare. Only 12,000 were produced over 3 years. 
The distinguishing features for the 1st issue are:
•             flared, square cornered shaped grip (also featured in the 2nd Issue)
•             split articulated hammer
•             small round side plate located between the rear of the cylinder and the grip (similar to early Colt open tops)
•             in early models a flat spring barrel mount catch.
There are said to also be 6 sub-variations within the 1st Issue. Each of these include minor changes in design such as the barrel latch going form a flat spring to a bayonet style. The barrel rifling and recoil shield was also changed.
Serial Numbers range for Model 1 1st issue were 1-12,000
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Model 1 - 2nd Issue
S&W Model 1 - 2nd Issue
The 2nd Issue of the Model 1 shares the same grip and frame design as the 1st issue so they are often confused. There are several notable differences listed below.
•             The side plate on the 2nd Issue was much larger and irregularly shaped replacing the round one.
•             The profile of the frame was more flat
•             the hammer was now made in one piece
110,000 2nd Issues were produced from 1860- 1868
Serial numbers range  12,000 - 120,000
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Model 1- 3rd Issue
Smith and Wesson Model 1- 3rd Issue
The Model 1 3rd Issue included a more substantial change in design from the 1st and 2nd  Issue.
Changes included:
  • fluted cylinder
  • round barrel
  • rounded "bird's head" style grip
  • Finish options included nickel plate and blued steel
Produced from 1868 through 1882, the 3rd Issues were serial number range 1 -  131,000.

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The Model 1 1/2 had three issues. The first two (known as the first and second issues) were "tip-up" revolvers with the barrel release catch located on the side of the frame in front of the trigger, while the third (known as the "Model 1 1/2 Single Action Revolver") was a "top-break", with the barrel release catch located on the top of the frame, just in front of the hammer.
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Model 1 1/2 1st Issue
S&W Model 1 1/2 1st Issue
The first issue of the Model 1 1/2 can be identified by :
·         smooth cylinder (lacking fluting)
·         square shape of the grip butt
·         blued or nickel plated finishes
·          most had 3 1/2" barrels, 4" barrel were made but less common
Serial number range 1 - 26,300
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Model 1 1/2 - 2nd Issue
The second issue of the Model 1 1/2 features:
·         rounded barrel
·         rounded shape of the grip butt
·         also produced in blued steel and nickel plated finish
·          commonly 3 1/2" barrel, A rare 2 1/2" barrel was also made with the barrel markings on the side of the barrel  as opposed to the top strap on  3 1/2" barrels.
2nd Issue serial numbered consecutively after the 1st Issue were 26,300 -  127,000.
There was a transitional run in 2nd issue that used unrounded 1st issue barrels. The serial number range for transitional models was approximately 27,200 through 28,800.
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Single Action Revolver
Smith & Wesson Model No. 1 1/2 Single Action Revolver
The third issue Model 1 1/2 is known as the "Model No. 1 1/2 Single Action Revolver"
There were major changes in this model including:
·         Top break design (just forward of the hammer)
·         No ejector rod under the barrel
·          large hinge located in front of and just below the barrel
·          an extractor that ejects spent cartridges when the barrel is opened
·         rounded butt grips similar to ones on the 2nd Issue
·         marked the debut of the .32 S&W centerfire cartridge.
Serial numbers range  1 - 97,500

Flechettes, THV, B-Patrone, and Other Unusual Ammo With Cut Away Cross Sections

Flechettes are arrow like bullets used in conventional gun models. It's an armor piercing ammunition that has practically no stopping power, but very high penetration and very high velocity.

7.92x57 spotter Ammo Cartridge called B-Patrone. Inertia pin activated which strikes a small capsule of explosive, spreading the white phosphorous. Shows point of impact. Was used in WW2 against the Russians

THV = Très Haute Vitesse meaning very high speed- Originally conceived in France in an attempt to produce an ammo particularly intended for police use. The intent was to achieve good penetration, stopping power and accuracy lowered recoil and to lessen the "danger to surroundings outside the target";

Credit and Thanks go to Kevin Gross (wolfganggross ) Lots More of These Cut-Away Photos To Come

30.06 Special Purpose, AP, Tracer, API and Match projectiles Cut In Half Views

 30.06 Special Purpose with history of the AP, Tracer, API and Match projectiles

Credit and Thanks go to Kevin Gross (wolfganggross ) Lots More of These Cut-Away Photos To Come

Allied and German WWII Rounds Cut Cut In Half (Cross Sectioned)

7.92mm WW2 German, 30/40 two piece cases, 8mm/ 6.5 Carcano, Mix 8mm
7.92mm WW2 German, 30/40 two piece cases, 8mm/ 6.5 Carcano, Mix 8mm

Credit and Thanks go to Kevin Gross (wolfganggross ) Lots More of These Cut-Away Photos To Come